Pan-Seared Salmon with Spinach and Shiitake

Note: This post is from the early days of my blog; I no longer eat fish.

We found this one on Fine Cooking’s website; the link will take you to the recipe.  Salmon is high in protein, omega-3‘s, and Vitamin D, among other vitamins.  Wild-caught salmon is much better both nutritionally and gustatorily than farm-raised salmon, as is the case with most fish and meats.  We buy wild-caught when we can find it, but the only salmon at the store today was farm-raised.  And what more is there to say about spinach than “look at Popeye“?

Only one modification was required to meet the 10-Day Challenge’s no-dairy rule, and that was to substitute soy milk for the heavy cream.  I wasn’t sure how this would work, but it actually turned out just fine.  The soy milk evaporated faster than heavy cream usually does, so the result was that the spinach-shiitake mixture was perhaps a little thicker than it would have been otherwise.  Our piece of salmon took much longer to cook than the time given in the recipe, so I ended up putting the whole pan in a 400-degree oven to avoid burning the outsides.  By the way, this technique (pan-roasting) is a great way to get a nice sear on the outside but avoid drying the fish out.  Just sear until one side is nicely-colored, then flip the fish and put the pan in a preheated oven until it’s cooked through.  It’s also a great way to sear your entire hand if you don’t leave the potholder on the panhandle after the pan is out of the oven!  I know this from experience (actually two experiences, within a week of each other, the second of which delighted Erin).

Here’s how it turned out:

[Matt photo]

[Salmon Photo]

This dish was really good!  We found that there wasn’t quite enough lemon pan-sauce to drizzle, so we added some more lemon to the salmon on the plates.  The salmon was nice and simple, but the spinach-shiitake mixture is what made the dish for us.  It had a surprising heartiness to it.   My only complaint was that there wasn’t enough of it; in fact if I make this again I’ll double that part.  All in all we give it 4 stars out of 5.  Actually, we need a more exciting rating scale than stars, and Erin has suggested cows instead.  So 4 cows out of 5.

Red Meat Consumption Linked to Early Death

Someone sent me this link today [UPDATE: link no longer works]; the story was on the front page of Yahoo! news and the Washington Post.  It seems like every day a new study finds that some food is good/bad for you, contradicting the previous month’s study which showed that the same food is bad/good for you.  But for what it’s worth, I thought I’d share the latest.

Tomorrow’s meal: Pasta with Roasted Cauliflour, Arugula and Prosciutto (minus the prosciutto).

6 Comments

 


Dig this post?
Spread the word!

Keep in touch:

How to Eat Plant-Based and Get All the Protein You Need



Want to eat a whole-food plant-based diet, but worried about protein?

wooden signpost near a pathOur 7-Day Kickstart Plan is unique in that it focuses on the highest quality whole foods (including the 7 foods worth eating every day), while also providing protein-boost options, in case you're especially concerned about protein. The Kickstart Plan includes:
  • A 7-day meal plan, built around the foods worth eating every single day
  • Daily protein boost options to give you the confidence that you're getting what you need
  • Focused on simplicity and speed, to minimize stress and time commitment
It's the best way we know of to get started with a whole-food, plant-based diet, for just 7 bucks. Learn more here!

Comments

  1. This dish looks great! I’m not much of a Salmon man myself. Would you recommend any other type of fish that would go well with the spinach?

  2. Christine says:

    yeah that does look delish! Any difference using fresh or frozen fish? I shop at Costco and usually end up freezing the majority of fresh food I get. I’ve been eyeing up their massive hunks of salmon but was nervous about the investment. With a rating like 4 out of 5 cows, I think now’s the time!

    I’m surprised to hear that wild salmon is more nutritious. Just seems like the people who raise salmon would alter the conditions/diet until their salmon were the best.

Leave a Comment

*